1. doomsdayplus1:

    hystericalmarissa:

    I actually think that drawing a line is missing the point. The problem is that female characters are drawn with the male gaze first and foremost in mind. That’s the problem. It’s not solved by saying “It’s okay for female characters to be in this pose but not that pose.” The problem is solved by thinking of female characters as superheroes whose costumes and fight poses should illustrate their heroicness/powers/fighting abilities, not how sexy they are. 

    Right, but you’re missing my point. I’m asking women who are sensitive to this issue what I, as a comic book artist who will occasionally be forced to draw women, where the boundaries are. I’m not making a broad assessment about this thing, I want to know as a person looking to not make women feel uncomfortable looking at my art, you know? Some of the images I’ve seen in the hashtag are completely and utterly unsexy by my standards but apparently ALL standards because someone took the time to draw it and make a point there.

    I assure you that when I draw female characters it is not with the “male gaze” “first and foremost” in MY mind and I actually find it kind of disheartening that you must think that way.

    I admit that I was possibly a little inarticulate in my original post because I am not asking for a list of approved poses from women, I just want to know… what women want? What is inoffensive? Trust me when I say that I’ve poked fun at my share of Rob Liefelds, Michael Turners, Greg Lands, etc. and I’ve shared a table with a woman who uncomfortably drew the raunchiest pinups she could come up with because she thought it would sell to guys at a comic convention (it didn’t) and my concern is that by this movement being so wide spread, with such ridiculous examples, the cause is being hurt more than its helped because people like me who are paying attention just throw their hands up because you just can’t win. I’d like to be sensitive to the subject but its hard when some basic poses, even photo-reffed stuff is now “off limits.” 

    Any how, thank you for taking the time to answer me at all. I appreciate that. 

    Just keep doing what you’re doing, then. If the criticism doesn’t apply to you (which I don’t think it does, I went through the first few pages of your art tumblr and didn’t see anything problematic), then don’t make it about you.

    There were a couple of posts on the Hawkeye Initiative site where I wasn’t sure why the original works were selected, but I guess only the artists in question can answer that. But my main point was that in the comic book industry, female characters are in general developed and drawn with the male gaze in mind. That’s the default state. So it doesn’t necessarily matter what individual panel is chosen, so long as it’s from such a mainstream comic that engages in that kind of objectification in general. 

  2. doomsdayplus1:

    So here’s the thing, I’m more than willing to accept that I’m wrong here because I don’t consider myself the expert on gender inequalities in comics or whatever BUT I’ve noticed that a few of these Hawkeye initiative things have taken relatively tame examples of sexist poses in comic art and stretched the whole point way thin for comedic effect. The majority of them have not, but there have been a few that made me go, “Really? That’s too much?”

    As a guy that’s drawing comics, I’ve drawn my share of women and I honestly don’t have to try very hard to keep it tame because that’s just not my style. I’m not really that guy. I’m kind of prudish. See for yourself. You can probably find some examples of art I’ve drawn and say “No Ramon, you’re ignorantly contributing to the perpetuation of this whole thing” and if you do, sorry about that but here’s the thing, it’s just men doing this stuff. I’ve seen a lot of women at cons selling art that features the same kind of distasteful art as men. If I wanted to, I could probably find a bunch of female comic artists doing the same thing but they’re generally not held to that same standard. I know you’re probably thinking that I’m using a false equivalency here, and because there are SOOO many more men that draw terrible comics, I’m not sure I’d disagree with you on that point.

    I guess the point of this is to ask where the line is? I feel like I know where it is but seeing some of these submissions have made me second guess myself.

    I actually think that drawing a line is missing the point. The problem is that female characters are drawn with the male gaze first and foremost in mind. That’s the problem. It’s not solved by saying “It’s okay for female characters to be in this pose but not that pose.” The problem is solved by thinking of female characters as superheroes whose costumes and fight poses should illustrate their heroicness/powers/fighting abilities, not how sexy they are. 

  3. "

    This subject is old but I have never answered it in its entirety. And even with this post it will remain incomplete.

    The question why I would LET Willow cut her hair. First the LET must be challenged. This is a world where women,girls are constantly reminded that they don’t belong to themselves; that their bodies are not their own, nor their power or self determination. I made a promise to endow my little girl with the power to always know that her body, spirit and her mind are HER domain. Willow cut her hair because her beauty, her value, her worth is not measured by the length of her hair. It’s also a statement that claims that even little girls have the RIGHT to own themselves and should not be a slave to even their mother’s deepest insecurities, hopes and desires. Even little girls should not be a slave to the preconceived ideas of what a culture believes a little girl should be.

    More to come. Another day.

    "

    Jada Pinkett Smith on women, girls, & Willow’s ability to own herself

    via Necole Bitchie

    *so relevant*

    (via lati-negros)

  4. avantbear:

queer the restroom. 

    avantbear:

    queer the restroom. 

  5. Having white privilege does not mean

    realestniggacailou:

    • that your life is awesome
    • that you are rich
    • that you are happy
    • that you are perfect and/or flawless
    • that you are pretty
    • that you are abled bodied, cis, straight, or male
    • nothing bad every happened to you ever
    • that a black/POC has never done some fucked up shit to you
    • that black/POC can’t do fucked up shit
    • that black/POC are perfect/flawless
    • that you never cried
    • that you never had pain
    • that your family was here during slavery
    • that you are intentionally a bad, terrible person
    • that you can’t have a shitty day
    • that all white people every where never had anything bad happen to them ever
    • that your pain isn’t a valid emotion(do not mistake valid with appropriate, needed/wanted, unnecessary in a certain time or place)

    What having white privilege means:

    • You, because of your whiteness and your whiteness alone, have uncountable and unfair advantages over POC because of centuries long oppression. These advantages can help you in every aspect of life and are completely unwarranted and built on murder, death, and hate. 
    • That you need to recognize this and get over it and work with POC to make everything 100% equal for everyone ever(who would say no to that?)
    • That once everything is 100% equal in all aspects of life, there will be no white privilege to loathe. 
  6. missmisandry:

Okay, while I’m always willing to pass on what I know, I usually prefer if people ask, rather than demand :)
I guess to me, being an intersectional feminist is the simple matter of not being a douche bag. It’s about thinking about how your actions affect others, and how the words you say can either be inclusive of others, or exclusive. And you don’t want to be exclusive.
Here are some tips that I try to follow on Tumblr:
Follow a lot of blogs run by POC, particularly WOC and queer MOC. Many write posts regarding their experiences and the challenges they face. Read them. Don’t send them questions asking them to explain things to you, because they aren’t here to be your teachers. They’re here to have a safe space to write about their day, and they don’t need someone in their ask box asking to be educated about matters that are really important to them. I’ve seen many of them say that it’s mentally exhausting. So just read, and if you have a question—google is your friend. 
If you see a post written by a POC (particularly WOC) pertaining to their struggles or their point of view regarding their own community, don’t jump in. It’s not your place.  Especially if you have different views. I don’t know for certain, but going by your icon, you look white. Which is cool, but just know that your opinion in these matters means nothing. You don’t have the experience or the understanding to comprehend what they are talking about. And a huge problem of white feminism is talking over WOC and their experiences. 
I’m not saying you can’t reblog their posts— you can, as long as they’ve signified they’re okay with that post being reblogged. But just know that the moment you put a post on your blog, you’re responsible for what your followers do with it. If one of your followers is super racist on the post, it’s your responsibility to shut that shit down. You’re the reason the OP is getting hate on their post from that person, and you need to make it right.
When criticizing men in the media for violence against women, or violent lyrics in music, consider who you are going after. If the only people you are attacking are Chris Brown and Tyler the Creator, consider why that is. Because even if you don’t think you’re being racist, if you’re giving passes to the likes of Sean Penn, John Lennon, Avenged Sevenfold, and Eminem, that’s a big problem. 
When talking about the wage gap, keep in mind that the 77 cent figure only relates to white men and white women. The figures for WOC and MOC as related to white men are much lower. 
DON’T compare any oppression you faced with things like slavery, lynchings, the Holocaust or anything like that.
Don’t culturally appropriate, or excuse/celebrate people who do.
Cissexism & Heterosexism
Acknowledge the existence of trans* people and don’t leave them out of your discourse.
Follow a lot of blogs run by queer people, and follow the same rules listed above about respecting their boundaries.
Remember that not all women have vaginas, and not all men have penises. This is particularly important considering feminism’s tendency to relate penises with manhood. Having a penis =/= being a man. A lot of feminists will mock penises as a way to cope with living in the patriarchy, but that completely disregards women with penises. Trans* women are REAL women. Trans* men are REAL men.
Jokes like “justin bieber looks like a woman!” are transphobic. Saying you can practically see a woman’s adam’s apple is transphobic.
Respect a person’s preferred pronouns. If you don’t know, ask.
If a person says they are agender or genderfluid, or any other gender configuration, then they are. 
Know that marriage equality is a priority, but it’s not the most important issue regarding the queer communiity.
Respect a person’s sexual orientation. They aren’t lying about who they are or are not attracted to.
People have the right to act as masculine or femme as they want.
Religion
This is particularly important with Islam. Radfems LOVE to bag on Islam as a woman hating religion when that absolutely is not true. The vast majority of women who wear head coverings are doing so electively. In the words of Ainee, don’t confuse culture with religion.
Respect the validity of other religions, even if they are not mainstream. 
Body positivity
Being fat is PERFECTLY OKAY. Fat people don’t owe their health to you. They can dress how they want, go where they want, do what they want and eat what they want without any judgment.
The same goes for thin people, but know that thin people, while they will experience body policing to a certain degree, will never face the same kind of discrimination fat people do. Don’t compare the two situations.
Body hair on women is not disgusting. Women have no obligation to shave their legs/underarms/genitals. Similarly, they don’t have any obligation to remain hairy if they’d rather shave.
Disabilities and mental health
Be really mindful of the language you use. Ableist language is something I personally struggle with. Words like dumb, stupid, idiot, lame and other things are ableist.
Don’t describe yourself as depressed, bipolar, schizophrenic, or having any other mental affliction if you are not diagnosed so. It trivializes the experiences of those who are.
Sex positivity
As a feminist, you probably already have a pretty good idea about sex positivity. But you need to acknowledge that the way sexuality is applied to other groups is different. White women can participate in things like slutwalks without even realizing that words like that can be empowering for them, but have been used to shame and hypersexualize WOC from a young age. Ditto trans* women.
Also note that people have the right to be nonsexual if they want to. There is nothing wrong with being a virgin or abstaining from sex.
There’s nothing wrong with bdsm and other kinks as long as the people involved are consenting to it. Nothing is degrading if the person wants it to happen.
Supporting sex work is great and all, and individuals who want to participate in sex work willngly should be supported. But in your support, don’t ignore the fact that many people are forced into sex work and are not consenting in what is happening to them.
Classism/education
Don’t assume that because somebody hasn’t had a formal education they are somehow less intelligent than you. Their points are still valid, and often stem from personal experence, which is a thing no classroom can teach you.
Dictionary definitions don’t mean shit.
Because something was written in a history book, it doesn’t mean it happened that way. History is written by the oppressors.
When advocating for a more eco-conscious lifestyle, remember that not everybody has the ability or resources to live the way you are suggesting. It doesn’t make them a bad person for doing it.
A couple of other things:
Know that you’re going to mess up. You can try as hard as possible not to, but it’s going to happen. You’ve been raised with several privileges that pretty much guarantee you’ll fuck up once. If someone calls you out for it, don’t get defensive. Apologize and learn. And don’t do any of those bullshit apologies like *I’m sorry you got offended* because that puts the responsibility on the person you upset. Just apologize for what you did and learn from it. Hell, I’ve probably fucked up a gazillion times in this post without realizing it.
Recognize that none of the categories above are exclusive. There are black muslims and disabled trans women and Latin@ bisexuals and all the combinations in between. Don’t ignore their existence.
Don’t be offended by posts calling white people crackers, or saying things like ‘die cisscum”. They are writing things such as that for a reason and no matter how much it might sting to read, nothing they write in their posts will ever inflict the amount of pain they have suffered in their lifetime just for being different than you.
Don’t be a radfem and look down on women who choose more traditional lifestyles. Their choice to get married and have kids is just as valid as whatever choice you make for yourself.
In the future, don’t come to me to tell you how to deal with groups I am not part of. I have absolutely no authority to tell you what will or will not offend people. I can only tell you what will or will not offend me.
And last thing, feminism doesn’t mean jack shit if you’re not intersectional.

    missmisandry:

    Okay, while I’m always willing to pass on what I know, I usually prefer if people ask, rather than demand :)

    I guess to me, being an intersectional feminist is the simple matter of not being a douche bag. It’s about thinking about how your actions affect others, and how the words you say can either be inclusive of others, or exclusive. And you don’t want to be exclusive.

    Here are some tips that I try to follow on Tumblr:

    • Follow a lot of blogs run by POC, particularly WOC and queer MOC. Many write posts regarding their experiences and the challenges they face. Read them. Don’t send them questions asking them to explain things to you, because they aren’t here to be your teachers. They’re here to have a safe space to write about their day, and they don’t need someone in their ask box asking to be educated about matters that are really important to them. I’ve seen many of them say that it’s mentally exhausting. So just read, and if you have a question—google is your friend. 
    • If you see a post written by a POC (particularly WOC) pertaining to their struggles or their point of view regarding their own community, don’t jump in. It’s not your place.  Especially if you have different views. I don’t know for certain, but going by your icon, you look white. Which is cool, but just know that your opinion in these matters means nothing. You don’t have the experience or the understanding to comprehend what they are talking about. And a huge problem of white feminism is talking over WOC and their experiences. 
    • I’m not saying you can’t reblog their posts— you can, as long as they’ve signified they’re okay with that post being reblogged. But just know that the moment you put a post on your blog, you’re responsible for what your followers do with it. If one of your followers is super racist on the post, it’s your responsibility to shut that shit down. You’re the reason the OP is getting hate on their post from that person, and you need to make it right.
    • When criticizing men in the media for violence against women, or violent lyrics in music, consider who you are going after. If the only people you are attacking are Chris Brown and Tyler the Creator, consider why that is. Because even if you don’t think you’re being racist, if you’re giving passes to the likes of Sean Penn, John Lennon, Avenged Sevenfold, and Eminem, that’s a big problem. 
    • When talking about the wage gap, keep in mind that the 77 cent figure only relates to white men and white women. The figures for WOC and MOC as related to white men are much lower. 
    • DON’T compare any oppression you faced with things like slavery, lynchings, the Holocaust or anything like that.
    • Don’t culturally appropriate, or excuse/celebrate people who do.

    Cissexism & Heterosexism

    • Acknowledge the existence of trans* people and don’t leave them out of your discourse.
    • Follow a lot of blogs run by queer people, and follow the same rules listed above about respecting their boundaries.
    • Remember that not all women have vaginas, and not all men have penises. This is particularly important considering feminism’s tendency to relate penises with manhood. Having a penis =/= being a man. A lot of feminists will mock penises as a way to cope with living in the patriarchy, but that completely disregards women with penises. Trans* women are REAL women. Trans* men are REAL men.
    • Jokes like “justin bieber looks like a woman!” are transphobic. Saying you can practically see a woman’s adam’s apple is transphobic.
    • Respect a person’s preferred pronouns. If you don’t know, ask.
    • If a person says they are agender or genderfluid, or any other gender configuration, then they are. 
    • Know that marriage equality is a priority, but it’s not the most important issue regarding the queer communiity.
    • Respect a person’s sexual orientation. They aren’t lying about who they are or are not attracted to.
    • People have the right to act as masculine or femme as they want.

    Religion

    • This is particularly important with Islam. Radfems LOVE to bag on Islam as a woman hating religion when that absolutely is not true. The vast majority of women who wear head coverings are doing so electively. In the words of Ainee, don’t confuse culture with religion.
    • Respect the validity of other religions, even if they are not mainstream. 

    Body positivity

    • Being fat is PERFECTLY OKAY. Fat people don’t owe their health to you. They can dress how they want, go where they want, do what they want and eat what they want without any judgment.
    • The same goes for thin people, but know that thin people, while they will experience body policing to a certain degree, will never face the same kind of discrimination fat people do. Don’t compare the two situations.
    • Body hair on women is not disgusting. Women have no obligation to shave their legs/underarms/genitals. Similarly, they don’t have any obligation to remain hairy if they’d rather shave.

    Disabilities and mental health

    • Be really mindful of the language you use. Ableist language is something I personally struggle with. Words like dumb, stupid, idiot, lame and other things are ableist.
    • Don’t describe yourself as depressed, bipolar, schizophrenic, or having any other mental affliction if you are not diagnosed so. It trivializes the experiences of those who are.

    Sex positivity

    • As a feminist, you probably already have a pretty good idea about sex positivity. But you need to acknowledge that the way sexuality is applied to other groups is different. White women can participate in things like slutwalks without even realizing that words like that can be empowering for them, but have been used to shame and hypersexualize WOC from a young age. Ditto trans* women.
    • Also note that people have the right to be nonsexual if they want to. There is nothing wrong with being a virgin or abstaining from sex.
    • There’s nothing wrong with bdsm and other kinks as long as the people involved are consenting to it. Nothing is degrading if the person wants it to happen.
    • Supporting sex work is great and all, and individuals who want to participate in sex work willngly should be supported. But in your support, don’t ignore the fact that many people are forced into sex work and are not consenting in what is happening to them.

    Classism/education

    • Don’t assume that because somebody hasn’t had a formal education they are somehow less intelligent than you. Their points are still valid, and often stem from personal experence, which is a thing no classroom can teach you.
    • Dictionary definitions don’t mean shit.
    • Because something was written in a history book, it doesn’t mean it happened that way. History is written by the oppressors.
    • When advocating for a more eco-conscious lifestyle, remember that not everybody has the ability or resources to live the way you are suggesting. It doesn’t make them a bad person for doing it.

    A couple of other things:

    • Know that you’re going to mess up. You can try as hard as possible not to, but it’s going to happen. You’ve been raised with several privileges that pretty much guarantee you’ll fuck up once. If someone calls you out for it, don’t get defensive. Apologize and learn. And don’t do any of those bullshit apologies like *I’m sorry you got offended* because that puts the responsibility on the person you upset. Just apologize for what you did and learn from it. Hell, I’ve probably fucked up a gazillion times in this post without realizing it.
    • Recognize that none of the categories above are exclusive. There are black muslims and disabled trans women and Latin@ bisexuals and all the combinations in between. Don’t ignore their existence.
    • Don’t be offended by posts calling white people crackers, or saying things like ‘die cisscum”. They are writing things such as that for a reason and no matter how much it might sting to read, nothing they write in their posts will ever inflict the amount of pain they have suffered in their lifetime just for being different than you.
    • Don’t be a radfem and look down on women who choose more traditional lifestyles. Their choice to get married and have kids is just as valid as whatever choice you make for yourself.
    • In the future, don’t come to me to tell you how to deal with groups I am not part of. I have absolutely no authority to tell you what will or will not offend people. I can only tell you what will or will not offend me.

    And last thing, feminism doesn’t mean jack shit if you’re not intersectional.

  7. "I must confess that over the past few years I have been gravely disappointed with the white moderate. I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro’s great stumbling block in his stride toward freedom is not the White Citizen’s Counciler or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the white moderate, who is more devoted to “order” than to justice; who prefers a negative peace which is the absence of tension to a positive peace which is the presence of justice; who constantly says: “I agree with you in the goal you seek, but I cannot agree with your methods of direct action”; who paternalistically believes he can set the timetable for another man’s freedom; who lives by a mythical concept of time and who constantly advises the Negro to wait for a “more convenient season.” Shallow understanding from people of good will is more frustrating than absolute misunderstanding from people of ill will. Lukewarm acceptance is much more bewildering than outright rejection."
    Martin Luther King, Jr. Letter from a Birmingham Jail (via brashblacknonbeliever)
  8. "If you can convince the lowest white man he’s better than the best colored man, he won’t notice you’re picking his pocket. Hell, give him somebody to look down on, and he’ll empty his pockets for you."
    Lyndon B. Johnson (via x0)
  9. [added] Definitions you should take note of. The RFO website is down, but feel free to peruse these.

    racismfreeontario:

    from racismfreeontario.com (deena) and http://fuckyeahethnicwomen.tumblr.com/definitions

    SET 1 (will organize all together later)

    Assimilation: means being absorbed into the cultural tradition of the dominant society and consequently losing one’s historical identity. This is in contrast to acculturation in which there is an adaptation to a different culture but retention of original identity (Garcia & Van Soest, 2006; Pinderhughes, 1989; Potapchuk et al., 2005; Robbins, Chatterjee, & Canda, 1998; Soto, 2004; Thompson & Neville, 1999).

    Cultural Appropriation: Cultural appropriation is the adoption of some specific elements of one culture by a different cultural group. It can include the introduction of forms of dress or personal adornment, music and art, religion, language, or behavior. These elements are typically imported into the existing culture, and may have wildly different meanings or lack the subtleties of their original cultural context. Because of this, cultural appropriation is sometimes viewed negatively, and has been called “cultural theft. ( Haig‐Brown, 2010)

    Discrimination: is often codified by laws, regulations, and rules. People experience oppression when they are deprived of human rights or dignity and are (or feel) powerless to do anything about it. Sometimes the negative act is in the form of exclusion, in which people are denied the opportunity to participate in a certain right, benefit, or privilege. Sometimes the negative act is in the form of marginalization, in which people find that they are on the fringe of political, social, or economic consciousness. That sense of invisibility results in decisions being made by those in power that may be harmful simply because the needs were not considered.

    Ethnocentrism: is the tendency to automatically interpret reality from one’s own perspective as normative and or superior. Other groups are judged in relative to one’s own cultural beliefs (without cultural relativism), thus dismissing other perspectives as inferior or insignificant.

    Eurocentrism: is a belief or position that asserts the moral or evolutionary superiority of Anglo-European culture as the standard by which others are measured and evaluated and found to be deficient (Fleras and Kunz).

    Internalized racism: In contrast to white privilege, internalized racism is the development of ideas, beliefs, actions, and behaviors that support or collude with racism against oneself. It is the support of the supremacy and dominance of the dominant group through participation in the set of attitudes, behaviors, social structures, and ideologies that undergirds the dominating group’s power and privilege and limits the oppressed group’s own advantages (Potapchuk et al, 2005; Tatum, 1997).

    Orientalism:

    “For there is no doubt that imaginative geography and history help the mind to intensify its own sense of itself by dramatizing the distance and difference between what is close to it and what is far away.”

    – Edward Said

    The idea behind Orientalism, according to Edward Said, is that the West has created a dichotomy between the romantic, exoticized notion of “the Orient,” and the reality of “the East.” Asia and the Middle East are viewed through a prism of racism and prejudice; they are constructed as a singular, monolithic race that is backwards, and without culture and history. In order to enlighten the primitive societies, (“modernize”) the West has created culture, history and a future for them. The vantage point from here is from “the West,” versus “the Other.”

    Through Orientalism, women are objectified, their nationalities reduced to the “uncivilized,” and their identities to static, gender tropes. Asian women, for example- meaning women from anywhere within the continent of Asia- are products of this mysterious “Orient.” Western culture, as noted, depicts the “Orient,” as a savage, patriarchal land of harems, samurai and geishas. Elements from differing cultures around Asia are obscured and exoticized.

    Otherizing: The process by which minority women and men are portrayed as people who are removed in time, remote in space and marginal to society. They are considered unbefitting of equal treatment because of their inferiority or irrelevance. Also “othered” or “othering.”

    Prejudice: is the negative (or positive/idealized) attitudes, thoughts, and beliefs about an entire category of people formed without full knowledge or examination of the facts. And discrimination is acting on the basis of prejudice.

    Racism is the practice of discrimination and prejudice based on racial classification supported by the power to enforce that prejudice.

    Three subtle types of racism are captured in the concepts of symbolic racismaversive racism, and micro-inequities.

    a) Aversive racism: is another subtle form of prejudice. People who engage in the practice see themselves as non-racists, but they will do racist things, sometimes unintentionally, or they will avoid people without overt racist intent. What they believe about themselves and will attest to is the importance of fairness, equality, and justice, but because they have been exposed to the ever-present societal racism just by living in the United States, they will reflect it in their conduct (Durrheim & Dixon, 2004; Tatum, 1997).

    b) Symbolic racism: is expressed by those who may or may not perceive themselves as racist, but justify their negative judgment of others by asserting that the others do not abide by traditional values of the dominant group. People can perceive themselves as being fair and practicing equality by holding forth certain values, such as “individualism” or “work ethic” or “self-reliance,” and take negative action because the focal group does not share those values. So they perceive themselves as operating based on certain “objective” standards or “universal truths” rather than in opposition to the group based on their race (Durrheim & Dixon, 2004).

    c) Micro-inequities: Finally, good people can do bad things to others in ways for which there is no formal grievance, but still have negative (sometimes unintentionally) effect. This refers to micro- aggressions or micro-inequities. Micro-inequities are “those tiny, damaging characteristics of an environment, as these characteristics affect a person not of that environment. They are the comments, the work assignments, the tone of voice, the failure of acknowledgement in meetings or social gatherings. These are not actionable violations of law or policies, but they are clear, subtle indicators of lack of respect by virtue of membership in a group” (Rowe, 1990). These are forms of racism that as members of this society we all commit. People of color may commit these acts or maintain these attitudes against other people of color. The charge is to become able to recognize them and move ourselves and others beyond them to facilitate systemic change.

    Shadism: is a form of internalized, racial “self-hatred.” It is a legacy of cultural imperialism, and  is a form of skin tone bias that identifies groups and individuals on the basis of their degree of pigmentation. It is an evaluation of people that registers traits such as skin color, hair, and facial features in order to construct racially charged social hierarchies.

    Whiteness: a form of hegemony that allows one group to use its power to dominate a group in a position of less power” (Yee & Dumbrill, 2003, p. 102).

    White privilege: is one issue that must be confronted as a precondition to releasing the energy required to successfully challenge institutional racism.  It is the collection of benefits based on belonging to a group perceived to be white, when the same or similar benefits are denied to members of other groups. It is the benefit of access to resources and social rewards and the power to shape the norms and values of society that white people receive, unconsciously or consciously, by virtue of their skin color (Kivel, 2002; McIntosh,1988; Potapchuk et al., 2005;)

    Yellowface: at its core, is not only the practice of applying prostheses or paint to simulate a crude idea of what “Asians” look like; it is non-Asian bodies (usually white) controlling what it means to be Asian on screen and stage, particularly in lead/major roles. Tied to blackface and the portrayal of African Americans on the stage by whites in the nineteenth century, the term yellowface appears as early as the 1950s to describe the continuation in film of having white actors playing major Asian and Asian American roles and the grouping together of all makeup technologies used to make one look “Asian.”

    SET 2 for racismfreeontario.com by Sean Gee

    Critical Race Theory is an academic discipline focused upon the intersection of race, law and power (Critical Race Collective). 

    Default Subcategory Erasure is the phenomenon in which the dominant group is considered the standard by which other groups are defined. In race discourse this is seen in stereotypes, but is not limited to stereotypes. An example of such is the stereotype that “Asians are smart.” Clearly here, people of Asian descent are not the standard (which is not overtly stated; it is erased), their status is measured in relativity to the dominant group. It is not the case that “White people are lacking in intelligence,” as white people are the standard by which other groups are defined (Critical Race Collective). See: Whitenormativity and Linguistic Markedness.  (links below)

    Whitenormativity is the underlying assumption at an individual or structural level that white is normal or prototypical of unmarked categories. Simply put, the assumption that, unless overtly stated, white is the norm of any given particular thing. Whitenormativity is the phenomenon ofDefault Subcategory Erasure as it applies to the white dominant group (Critical Race Collective). 

    Eurocentrism is the holding of European values as a standard in which all other values are compared and contrasted to (Critical Race Collective).

    Holism is the view that one must study all aspects of a culture in order to understand the whole culture (Miller and Esterik, 2010). 

    Gender performativity is the tacit collective agreement to perform, produce, and sustain discrete and polar genders as cultural fictions is obscured by the credibility of those productions – and the punishments (see: the Heterosexual Market) that attend not agreeing to believe in them (Butler 1999, p 179).

    The Heterosexual Market is the metaphor which describes the peer social order that develops in adolescent years which considers masculinity and femininity as complementing functions (Eckert 1996).  The Heterosexual Market acts as a control of behaviour through social evaluation of peers.

    Gender is not something one is born with; it is not something one has; it is something that one does (West and Zimmerman 1987). Gender is something we perform (Butler 1990).  Gender is the performance of learned behaviours associated with social constructs of masculinity and femininity (Cahill 1986). [Butler’s definition, there are other ideas about gender]

    Cultural Relativism is the view that each culture must be understood in terms of the values and ideas of that culture and must not be judged by the standards of another culture (see: Ethnocentrism) (Miller and Esterik, 2010).

    Absolute Cultural Relativism is the ideology in which whatever practices occur within a culture must not be questioned or changed because doing so would be ethnocentric (Miller and Esterik, 2010).

    Critical Cultural Relativism offers an alternative view that poses questions about cultural practices and ideas in terms of who accepts them and why, and who they might be harming or helping (Miller and Esterik, 2010).

    Ethnocentrism is the judging of other cultures by the standards of one’s own culture (or the dominant culture) rather than by the standards of that particular culture (Miller and Esterik, 2010).

    provided by Sean Gee

  10. thewhitemankilledthetruth:

dionthesocialist:

thewhitemankilledthetruth:

I’ll even just make that fucking rebloggable so I never have to answer that question again.

White people, you don’t know how shitty it feels to be friends with someone, maybe even close friends with someone, and then one day out of the blue they say something so monumentally racist, you feel stupid for ever thinking they valued you as a human being. Feels bad man.

Bolding that whole fucking thing because it’s mad god damn important.
Because then you start to wonder - if it wasn’t me here, if was another one of my close white friends - would they let this person get away with saying this racist shit? Would any of my white friends take them to task for it? 

    thewhitemankilledthetruth:

    dionthesocialist:

    thewhitemankilledthetruth:

    I’ll even just make that fucking rebloggable so I never have to answer that question again.

    White people, you don’t know how shitty it feels to be friends with someone, maybe even close friends with someone, and then one day out of the blue they say something so monumentally racist, you feel stupid for ever thinking they valued you as a human being. Feels bad man.

    Bolding that whole fucking thing because it’s mad god damn important.

    Because then you start to wonder - if it wasn’t me here, if was another one of my close white friends - would they let this person get away with saying this racist shit? Would any of my white friends take them to task for it? 

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